Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘walker books’

Shirley Hughes is one of our most-loved and sacred children’s picture book writers. No one else, to this day has retained that classic sense of storytelling which Shirley achieved in her illustrations and charming stories of very normal, very likeable and fragile characters. Think Lucy and Tom, Alfie and Annie Rose and now we spend Christmas with Bronwen and Dylan.

When Bronwen and Dylan hear ghostly sounds on a cold Christmas Eve night, they hurry next door into the welcoming arms of their neighbour Mrs O’Riley and together they learn to face their fears and discover all is not what it seems.

Set in 1930’s Liverpool, we could be painted with a cold, dreary picture. Instead, Hughes’s story, brings to life the magic of this time of year and the warmth and kindness of her characters remind us that we don’t always need the gluttony and glamour modern day Christmas may bring. Beautiful, just beautiful.

May Shirley Hughes never go out of print, and never fall out of a child’s hands!

THE CHRISTMAS EVE GHOST

Shirley Hughes

9781406331074

£7.99 HB

Walker Books

Read Full Post »

This is a very special picture book. It stands out from the norm and belongs with the fairytale and gift book. For starters, it’s a hardback and would truly make a lovely, individual gift for somebody who loves picture books. The thing about this book is it will appeal to children but like Lane Smith’s ‘It’s a Book’ it has a little adult humour and the illustrative design will appeal to budding artists.

‘I want my hat back’ is all about the bear who has lost his favourite red hat. For every person he comes across on his walk, he asks if they’ve seen his hat but nobody has and none of them are exactly helpful! Until he comes across one pesky animal wearing something very familiar. This book will make you laugh and definitely appreciate the notion of ‘less is more’. Beautiful

I WANT MY HAT BACK

Jon Klassen

9781406336832

£11.99 HB

Walker Books

Read Full Post »

In a children’s book, the world can be anything you want it to be.

I think that’s part of what draws me back into children’s literature time and time again; why I go straight to the kids section when I walk into a book store, and why I spend far too much of my money discovering wondrous characters and fleeting adventures.

I was chatting with Kate Wilson the other day, MD of children’s publisher Nosy Crow and she asked if my interests were with fiction  or illustrated work – the answer was clear; illustrated. I so often recall a fond memory with the visual elements of a book. Thinking back…I do it all the time.

When I rediscovered Usborne’s First Experience series ‘Going to School’, it was the iconic illustration of the two children at school enjoying a break time snack of cookies and juice in amongst their craft making which brought everything back.  And when I found Jill Murphy’s ‘Five Minutes Peace’ in the loft, it was Mrs Large enjoying a huge slice of cake which brought the initial smile to my face.

Sometimes, a story needs pictures. That little something that connects us with what we’re reading- almost anthropomorphising characters which are otherwise just written text. That’s not to say that a story can’t hold it’s own just as a text…quite the opposite. It’s that a story can be so hauntingly beautiful or meaningful or just plain crazy, that it deserves to be forever animated, to honour its talent and imagination.

As Kate Wilson said, there’s a fine line between a picture and an illustration. The drawing has to go hand in hand with story being told. There are some wonderful successes with this notion. Just look at Oliver Jeffers’ Lost and Found…is there anything more iconic than that wonderful little boy and his friend the penguin?

Or the Gruffalo, oh yes that terrible creature with terrible claws and terrible teeth in his terrible jaws (by the way, he’s not that terrible, he sits quite happily guarding my bookcase with his beady orange eyes). Julia Donaldson has said that she doesn’t really communicate with illustrator Axel Scheffler when they work together. She writes the story and hands him the script and he bring the story to life. It’s truly a wonderful thing to see books like The Gruffalo become so iconic that when children come into the store and see the Gruffalo toy, their faces light up and they shout out lines from the book.

Having household names in children’s books, in particular picture books, is important for children to discover their likes and dislikes and latch on to something they like and to progress from there. But it’s equally important to discover something new, something that stops you in your tracks because it’s different and can only be described as imagination.

And that’s where Book Trust’s ‘Best New Illustrator’s Award comes in. It is a celebration of talented new illustrators and the talent on show here is just astounding. Take a look for yourself on the Book Trust website http://www.booktrust.org.uk/Prizes-and-awards/Best-New-Illustrators-Award

There’s a complete array of style on show; from the graphic design inspired to exotic, abstract colourings- it’s all just wondrous to look at and many of the final 10 have already had their illustrations published.

This award is just an honest celebration of great talent, bringing even more imagination into the wonderful world of children’s books.

Read Full Post »